cracked
cracked:

See what they all have in common? Aside from being paintings?
6 Mind-Blowing Discoveries We Just Made About Famous Art

#6. Portraits Usually Show the Left Side of the Face Due to a Weird Brain Bias
Sam Kean, author of The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, studied this weird phenomenon. He says that if the choice of which side to depict was totally random, we would find that gallery collections have roughly a third of all portraits facing straight forward, a third facing to the left, and a third facing to the right (obviously). However, studies show that this isn’t the case — about 60 percent of subjects sit with their left cheek facing the viewer, their left eye practically in the middle of the painting. It’s twice as common as it should be.

Read More

cracked:

See what they all have in common? Aside from being paintings?

6 Mind-Blowing Discoveries We Just Made About Famous Art

#6. Portraits Usually Show the Left Side of the Face Due to a Weird Brain Bias

Sam Kean, author of The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, studied this weird phenomenon. He says that if the choice of which side to depict was totally random, we would find that gallery collections have roughly a third of all portraits facing straight forward, a third facing to the left, and a third facing to the right (obviously). However, studies show that this isn’t the case — about 60 percent of subjects sit with their left cheek facing the viewer, their left eye practically in the middle of the painting. It’s twice as common as it should be.

Read More

archaeologyoftombraider
archaeologyoftombraider:

Lara Croft & the Temple of Osiris will be out on 9th December 2014. If you’re looking to expand your knowledge of Ancient Egypt before then, here are some of the Egypt-themed articles I’ve written for The Archaeology of Tomb Raider:
Oh My Gods! 5 Online Guides to Egyptian Gods and Religion
Arte-Factual: The Times Exclusive Level: Anubis Shrine
Lara’s Travels: Tomb of Semerkhet
Arte-Factual: Tomb Raider I: Egyptian Cat Statue
Arte-Factual: The Last Revelation: The Dendera Zodiac
Lara’s Travels: KV5
7 Egyptology Blogs You Should Be Following
10 Fantastic Free Resources for Learning Egyptian Hieroglyphs

archaeologyoftombraider:

Lara Croft & the Temple of Osiris will be out on 9th December 2014. If you’re looking to expand your knowledge of Ancient Egypt before then, here are some of the Egypt-themed articles I’ve written for The Archaeology of Tomb Raider:

wordsnquotes
Hemingwayesque
   [hem-ing-wey-esk]

(adjective) of, relating to, or like Ernest Hemingway or his literary style. In homage to Ernest Hemingway’s birthday today, July 21; we will honor Hemingway’s style. Yes, that’s right, the man gets his own style name. Hemingway is famous for his style: the short, factual sentences, the declarative nature of the words – Hemingway popularized this at a time when people were peppering parenthetical prepositional phrases into their work like there was no tomorrow. It’s as though everyone else was painting huge oil canvases, and Hemingway drew a penciled sketch that was somehow better than all the other works of the time. Pretty impressive stuff. Thanks Shmoop for the awesome metaphor! 

  • origin: 1940–45; Hemingway + -esque

Happy Birthday Ernest Hemingway! 

(via wordsnquotes)
todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!
Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944
From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969. Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie Pyle, Jack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)


Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

the-final-sentence

the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:

"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." 
— from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro

"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." 
— from “Indian Camp

"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." 
— from The Garden of Eden

"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." 
— from A Farewell to Arms

[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” 
— from Hills Like White Elephants

"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." 
— from For Whom the Bell Tolls

[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”
Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.
“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”
— from The Sun Also Rises

"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."
— from A Moveable Feast

"The old man was dreaming about the lions."
— from The Old Man and the Sea